Gender Wage Inequality in Sports – U.S. Woman’s National Team Seeks to Make History

It is indisputable that equal pay for women has been a long held controversial topic across the country. Pay discrepancies are beginning to be addressed in corporate America, Hollywood, and very recently in the world of sports. In March of 2016, five elite female athletes serving the U.S. women’s national soccer team (“WNT”), filed a complaint accusing the United States Soccer Federation (“USSF”) of pay discrimination, siting significant pay discrepancy with the U.S. Men’s National Team (“MNT”).[1]  The case, submitted to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”), a federal agency that enforces civil rights against workplace discrimination, provides leverage for the women’s team when they renegotiate their collective bargaining agreement at the end of 2016.[2]  The plaintiff’s named on the law suit are star players Carli Lloyd, Hope Solo, Megan Rapinoe, Becky Sauerbrunn, and Alex Morgan. The five are representative parties to the suit. One of the chief issues in the case, and also the economic focal point, is the amount of revenue the women’s team grosses compared to the men. According to the budget report from the USSF, the women’s team is projected to bring in more than $17 million in revenues, including a $5 million surplus for fiscal year 2017, nearly doubling their male counterparts, who are expected to run a deficit.[3]  Despite this, the women’s team is being pad significantly less than their male peers. For example, in 2018, the MNT is projected to make $76,000 per player just for making the World Cup roster, while the women’s team made $15,000 in 2015 for the same accomplishment.[4]  Furthermore, when a player on the men’s team qualifies...